WELCOME TO GOOSE CREEK COMMUNITY LAND TRUST


BVSD teacher Ina Rochelle, who works near the proposed housing at the City-owned Alpine Balsam site, supports abundant modest sized permanently attainable housing there serviced by a primarily car share and alternative modes transport system, rather than private autos. She knows it would work well because she has been doing it for 15 years at Wild Sage Cohousing! See video of Ina and  other Boulderites’ speaking up for housing here .

BVSD teacher Ina Rochelle, who works near the proposed housing at the City-owned Alpine Balsam site, supports abundant modest sized permanently attainable housing there serviced by a primarily car share and alternative modes transport system, rather than private autos. She knows it would work well because she has been doing it for 15 years at Wild Sage Cohousing! See video of Ina and other Boulderites’ speaking up for housing here.

Let’s meet our urgent housing crisis! Let’s prototype a Hopeful, Sustainable Future with a Vital Neighborhood Center at Alpine Balsam.

Write City Council and insist that the Area Plan to be finalized Oct 1 and the subsequent Implementation Plan ensures that:

  • City Land at AB provide maximum social and financial return to ALL.

  • Be a promised “new model” for “equitable, affordable and sustainable living” not a “barbell” city of rich and poor:

  • Offer significant for sale, permanently affordable, modest sized, middle income units with shared vehicles and affordable offices for local NGO’s etc

  • Reflect our Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan values of compact development, inclusivity and a sustainable urban pattern.

    Next Step: Write City Council today and speak in the Open Comment time at 6 pm Oct. 1 about the need for permanently attainable, mixed income housing citywide (sign up electronically; your speaking not guaranteed). Read the packet here.

Thanks to Jerry Shapins for this lovely envisioning of the future at Alpine Balsam: A view of potential housing and public spaces looking west into North Boulder Park with all development less than the 55’ Boulder height limit but that provides significant housing and a good return on taxpayers’ investment. By offering compact, mostly for sale, permanently affordable housing to a broad spectrum of families and local workers who are now in-commuting, we could take cars off the roads while creating a vital, walkable Alpine Balsam area that current neighbors can enjoy too.

Thanks to Jerry Shapins for this lovely envisioning of the future at Alpine Balsam: A view of potential housing and public spaces looking west into North Boulder Park with all development less than the 55’ Boulder height limit but that provides significant housing and a good return on taxpayers’ investment. By offering compact, mostly for sale, permanently affordable housing to a broad spectrum of families and local workers who are now in-commuting, we could take cars off the roads while creating a vital, walkable Alpine Balsam area that current neighbors can enjoy too.

View of “all modes friendly” at a new 10th St Ecomobility Plaza on Alpine

View of “all modes friendly” at a new 10th St Ecomobility Plaza on Alpine

A better Broadway at Alpine Balsam!

A better Broadway at Alpine Balsam!

This is a view from the Park east into the project: If the buildings are beautiful why can’t the western edge of the project share North Boulder Park with 3 or 4 story buildings as Planning Board has recommended? An ice cream and coffee shop could service parents watching their kids in the park…

This is a view from the Park east into the project: If the buildings are beautiful why can’t the western edge of the project share North Boulder Park with 3 or 4 story buildings as Planning Board has recommended? An ice cream and coffee shop could service parents watching their kids in the park…

Help us develop a positive vision that both meets the natural concerns of some neighbors about the AB project impact AND meaningfully dents our urgent housing crisis. For example, by providing transportation almost entirely with alternative modes and shared vehicles, project-generated auto traffic can be significantly less than traffic when the hospital operated. More info here.

Lessons from the April 17, 2019 Housing Dialogue with Jim Leach, Cohousing developer: In the late 1960’s Boulder city planning efforts resisted cookie cutter production home builders and encouraged Jim’s innovations of narrower streets, common green areas and other amenities that brought neighbors together. Despite his insistence that quality design featuring walkable-nature-connected plans with mixed housing sizes would create successful communities, neighborhood opposition was fierce. His many enduringly popular developments through to the recently sold out Washington School Co-housing, demonstrate the broad affection for diverse communities. His “lessons learned” can help us navigate from today’s period of displacement of middle income residents to a housing future demanding a response to the twin crisis of climate-environment and emergency and income inequality.

Let’s follow Boulder’s many other innovations in land use: Open Space, Pearl St Mall, Bike Greenways, Holiday Neighborhood.-NOT halfheartedly! We didn’t plan to develop an open space oasis around HALF of the City!

OUR MISSION

To ensure our land widely benefits generations of today and tomorrow, we will create, preserve and advocate for housing that is permanently attainable for a diversity of income levels.

NEWS

Hold the McMansion, Bring on the New American Dream!   750 North St. Single Family Split

Hold the McMansion, Bring on the New American Dream! 750 North St. Single Family Split

Penfield Tate.png
He would have been brutally frank that the city is still not as diverse as it needs to be, and in part it is because of political decisions made that have escalated the cost of housing tremendously so that it limits who can afford to live in the city, which impacts the ability and the potential for diversity.
— About African-American Boulder Mayor (1974-76), Penfield Tate II from son Penfield Tate III.

BOULDER LAND USE POLICIES INHIBIT DIVERSITY